Skip directly to content

Joshua Redman Trio: The Village Vanguard

News

  • April. 19, 2012
    Joshua Redman Trio: The Village Vanguard

    The Joshua Redman Trio, featuring bassist Matt Penman, a member with Redman of the band James Farm, and drummer Gregory Hutchinson, kick off a week’s residency at the Village Vanguard in New York City Tuesday night, with multiple sets to follow each night through Sunday, April 22.

     

    The New York Times recommends the shows. "Joshua Redman has lately put his tenor and soprano saxophone to work in the context of James Farm, a superarticulate postbop quartet, with strong direction from all four of its members," writes Times music critic Nate Chinen. "He returns to a more ostensibly hierarchical trio format here ... The results should be sleek and full of silvery digression." 

     

    "The saxophonist's appearances in the village continue to attract a mob scene," writes the Wall Street Journal's Will Friedwald in his review of Tuesday's opening-night concert. "The reasons for his popularity continue to be apparent: He plays in an aggressively engaging fashion, armed to the teeth with prodigious instrumental technique. But sheer chops are less his goal than accessibility—and he makes the most intricate bebop more user-friendly not by dumbing it down, but by playing it with such exuberant charisma. At the early show on Tuesday, he played an 80-minute set (including a moving "Autumn in New York") with so much energy that it was impossible to imagine him doing it all over again 40 minutes later."

     

    The set featured a number of Redman original tunes, which " are, for the most part, very short, riff-like lines, that Mr. Redman renders in an exuberant, engaging fashion and absolute linear clarity," writes Friedwald; "he's not playing the same thing over and over, nor is he drifting into outer space and parts unknown. But you always know exactly where he is in the tune, and, even more remarkably, he never lets those tunes wear out their welcome. Rather than attempt the kind of marathon endurance test that only Sonny Rollins should be allowed to perpetrate, Mr. Redman cuts off most tunes after five or six minutes, making him the rare contemporary jazzman who leaves his audiences wanting more of an extended improvisation. He achieves a complete state of sympatico with Messrs. Penman and Hutchinson, but even more so with the crowd. We cheer his every high note and breathe with him on every unaccompanied cadenza."

     

    Friedwald concludes: "It's said that life, and music in particular, is a journey, but once in a while it's gratifying to hear music that knows where it's going—and gets there."

     

    Read the complete concert review at online.wsj.com.

    0
siteadmin's picture
on April 19, 2012

The Joshua Redman Trio, featuring bassist Matt Penman, a member with Redman of the band James Farm, and drummer Gregory Hutchinson, kick off a week’s residency at the Village Vanguard in New York City Tuesday night, with multiple sets to follow each night through Sunday, April 22.

 

The New York Times recommends the shows. "Joshua Redman has lately put his tenor and soprano saxophone to work in the context of James Farm, a superarticulate postbop quartet, with strong direction from all four of its members," writes Times music critic Nate Chinen. "He returns to a more ostensibly hierarchical trio format here ... The results should be sleek and full of silvery digression." 

 

"The saxophonist's appearances in the village continue to attract a mob scene," writes the Wall Street Journal's Will Friedwald in his review of Tuesday's opening-night concert. "The reasons for his popularity continue to be apparent: He plays in an aggressively engaging fashion, armed to the teeth with prodigious instrumental technique. But sheer chops are less his goal than accessibility—and he makes the most intricate bebop more user-friendly not by dumbing it down, but by playing it with such exuberant charisma. At the early show on Tuesday, he played an 80-minute set (including a moving "Autumn in New York") with so much energy that it was impossible to imagine him doing it all over again 40 minutes later."

 

The set featured a number of Redman original tunes, which " are, for the most part, very short, riff-like lines, that Mr. Redman renders in an exuberant, engaging fashion and absolute linear clarity," writes Friedwald; "he's not playing the same thing over and over, nor is he drifting into outer space and parts unknown. But you always know exactly where he is in the tune, and, even more remarkably, he never lets those tunes wear out their welcome. Rather than attempt the kind of marathon endurance test that only Sonny Rollins should be allowed to perpetrate, Mr. Redman cuts off most tunes after five or six minutes, making him the rare contemporary jazzman who leaves his audiences wanting more of an extended improvisation. He achieves a complete state of sympatico with Messrs. Penman and Hutchinson, but even more so with the crowd. We cheer his every high note and breathe with him on every unaccompanied cadenza."

 

Friedwald concludes: "It's said that life, and music in particular, is a journey, but once in a while it's gratifying to hear music that knows where it's going—and gets there."

 

Read the complete concert review at online.wsj.com.

homeblogimage: 
[{"parent":{"title":"Get on the list!","body":"Get information about JOSHUA REDMAN tour dates, album releases, and special announcements","field_newsletter_id":"14073861","field_label_list_id":"6879317","field_display_rates":"0","field_preview_mode":"false","field_lbox_height":"","field_lbox_width":"","field_toaster_timeout":"600000","field_toaster_position":"From Top","field_turnkey_height":"1000","field_mailing_list_params_toast":"&autoreply=no","field_mailing_list_params_se":"&autoreply=no"}}]